Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year!

This is the last post of the tutorial, since from now I will be busy working on other projects. I hope you will find the material written here valuable and helpful for your music journey. Thank you everyone!

Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year!

news update: June 17, 2014 :  well, it seems not, because the tutorial will be soon updated again :P

Friday, November 8, 2013

Interview with producer Oleksandr Hrytsiv



Nick: Hello, Oleksandr, and thank you for accepting this interview! Please introduce yourself in a few words.

Oleksandr: Hello, Nick! Hello to all eurodance fans! I am a producer of eurodance band Free 2 Night and a remix producer Real Thing. I live in Tarnopil in Western Ukraine.

Nick: Please tell me when and how your eurodance passion started...

Oleksandr: I loved European dance music since my childhood. My first favorite groups were ABBA, Modern Talking, Sandra etc. And here is the big paradox – I started to listen eurodance only since 1998 when it was already on the decline.

Nick: How do you create an eurodance song? Which is the basic process?

Oleksandr: I started to learn music when I was 7 years old. I played piano a lot as my mother and my aunt – they are professional pianists. I created my first early eurodance in 1999 when I really fell in love with such music. When I create music at first I play my keyboard to feel how the bass line sounds with the melody which I composed in my head. Then I start to combine kicks and basses. It is the main process because if it is not right then all the tracks will sound very cheap.

Nick: Please tell me a little bit about the gear and the sofware you use.

Oleksandr: I always use FL Studio 8 and 9 with added vsti and my own samples libraries. Also as I said I have a very good keyboard M-Audio and a several types of 3-linear high quality speakers.

Nick: Do you want to share some tips and tricks about making eurodance music?

Oleksandr: The main tricks are to have a good musical hearing, to love a good music with all of your heart and never stop learning. And there is one more important thing to know how to work in a group and with other people.

Nick: Which are your favorite 90s eurodance music acts?

Oleksandr: There are so many great eurodance acts from the 90s! I think my favorites are 2 Unlimited, Culture Beat, Dr. Alban, Snap!

Nick: Tell me a few things about your new eurodance project "Free 2 Night". Which are your future plans?

Oleksandr: I don’t want to call it “plans”, because only God knows the future of each. We have many ideas about new singles, albums, videos etc. We will do the best!

Nick: Do you think the classic eurodance genre can return on the commercial scene one day?
 

Oleksandr: I think it will return if people will really want that. It depends on only of each one of us.

Nick: Please tell a few words about our eurodance tutorial blog, do you find it useful?

Oleksandr: Yes of course! I find it very useful to all the people who wants to start to create eurodance tracks and to learn something new.

Nick: Thank you, Oleksandr! I wish you lots of good luck!

Oleksandr: Thanks for interview, Nick! The same good wishes to you and to all eurodance fans and composers!



Thursday, October 24, 2013

Friday, October 18, 2013

Interview with producer Mike Hoffmann



Nick: Hello, Mike, and thank you for accepting this interview! Please introduce yourself in a few words. 


Mike: I'm musican, 34 years old, living in Leipzig, Germany. I'm married since 8 years and fan of the classical eurodance-sound. And since March 2013 musican and producer for the eurodance-act "Flash Point"


Nick: Please tell me how you've started your journey into the eurodance world

Mike: If I remember rightly, this journey started with a class trip 1993. It was the first time where i heard songs like "Mr Vain", "No Limit" and "What is Love", as some mates played this music in their ghettoblaster all the week. *laugh* It was the beginning of my love to the classical techno-trance -and eurodancesound until today.


Nick: How do you make an eurodance song? How it all starts and which is your basic process?

Mike: Normally, first i write the song on keyboard. And than i melodize the song in the classical eurodance-style. Here i'm starting with the choice of sounds. First kick, hat's, snare and bassline, than arps, pads, strings, leadsound, and than all other elements. In the 2nd phase i build the arrangement. Here can also some sounds change, until everything sounds great for me. The next step is the recording of the vocals. And then i'm starting with the mixing of the song.


Nick: Please tell me a little bit about the gear and the sofware you use. How important it is?

Mike: In my home-studio i'm using almost entirely software. The DAWs "Fl -Studio" and "Studio One", some vsti-versions from classical Korg-synths, the Synapse Dune and a large colletcion of sample-libarys from the 90's. I think, the gear is importent, because without the gear you can't produce music. But the best gear is just as good as the man or the women who is using that.


Nick: Could you please tell some "secrets" for the people who want to create eurodance music?

Mike: I don't know any secrets. I think, the most importent thing is to have a passion for this kind of music.


Nick: Which are your favorite 90s eurodance music acts?

Mike: I really like all the eurodancesongs with trance-elements inside. Songs from Snap, Culture Beat, Magic Affair, Jam & Spoon, General Base and also songs from Intermission, Captain Hollywood Project, Real McCoy, Pharao and 2 Brothers on the 4th Floor. But also i like almost every other eurodance-song. I think there are just a very few eurodance song that i don't like.


Nick: Tell us a few things about your eurodance project "Flash Point". Which are your future plans?

Mike: Yes. The idea to "Flash Point" was born on a eurodance-party in March 2013. We thought, we like it to hear all the old songs again and again. But also, we want to hear new songs in the same style like the old hits. But he old acts just release new versions of their old songs year by year in the current sound. So we thought, ok, when WE will make the new songs, we want to hear. *laugh* Our next step is to release a follower-song for "Follow Me" in late 2013 or early 2014.


Nick: Do you think the classic eurodance genre can return on the commercial scene one day?

Mike: No, i don't think so. I think the time of music for the masses is slowly drawing to an end. It comes up more and more subgenres, provided by specialized independent labels for listeners with an individual musictaste. Because, today it's easy for any musican to make pro music for a low price, to make cooperations with musians from all over the world, and for independent labels to provided the fans on the whole planet.
I think, maybe the classical eurodance-scene of one single country is very small, But the classical eurodance-scene worldwide is big, with hundreds of thousands or millions of fans. So i think, acts like Free 2 Night, Acting Lovers, Pulse Of The Beat or likewise Flash Point belongs to an next classical-eurodance generation, that is specialized for an individual musictaste of the  eurodance-fans worldwide. But not for the masses of millions people, provided by the big music industry, like in the 90's, where classical eurodance was a part of it.

Nick: Thank you, Mike! I wish you lots of good luck!

Mike: Thank you, Nick! The same to you!


Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Making eurodance riffs with arpeggiators

Another technique to build eurodance riffs is with the help of arpeggiators.

It takes a little study but once you find how it works you can make great riffs.

I recommend you using the Kirnu Cream arpeggiator: http://www.kirnuarp.com/


Wednesday, September 18, 2013

How to get the classic 90s Eurodance sound: Korg M1 VST

A great addition for eurodance production is the Korg M1 VST.


Here are some great synth sounds you can try:

K 01 04 Unison stab

M 01 17 Perc organ

M 02 06 Super synth

M 14 06 4voices/03

M 14 26 8voices/14

Good luck!

Sunday, August 18, 2013

How to Create the Eurodance Riff - Tips and Tricks

It's time for another post dedicated to tips and tricks for creating the eurodance riff.

1. Keep in mind the V shape! 

This is an essential thing for the eurodance style. Notes go up and down, up and down and so on. This is what gives the dance movement!

There are 2 variants:


The UP V form (down-up)


The DOWN V form (up-down)

2. Use the 2 notes trick instead one (works good especially when working with 1 octave distance between notes)


3. Watch for continuity between the bars!! - when changing bars make sure your notes don't jump too much! :)


4. Modify the pitch for selected notes 

Use the following trick when making riffs:

Take some notes from the standard V shape and move them up or down - you will find great riffs!


Good luck!

Monday, July 22, 2013

The Eurodance Riff Contest 2013

Create a cool eurodance riff in the 90s style and win prizes in value of over $1,000 ! The Eurodance Riff Contest 2013 will start on August 1, 2013, so you better get your riffs ready! More details coming soon! Let's bring the 90s back! Check out the details and make sure you share the news!

http://eurodanceriffcontest.blogspot.com/ 

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Interview with producer Michal Karpac


Michal Karpac is a Slovakian eurodance producer, he is one of the young generation producers who try to keep the 90s Eurodance style alive.

Nick: Hello, Michal, and thank you for accepting this interview. Please introduce yourself in a few words.

Michal: Dance music is me, lol, I always wanted to do music, especially eurodance and now i do it

Nick: Please tell me how you've started your journey as an eurodance producer and your main produced acts.

Michal: A few years ago I started the project Floor Action and then I joined to the band Pulse Of The Beat founded by my friend Svetoslav Yankov, which I call Svetlo

Nick: How do you make an eurodance tune? Which is the base idea it all starts from?

Michal: I often let myself to get inspiration from other songs, films and from the world around me. I love production by Dieter Bohlen, he has the perfect melodies. I would like to be like him.

Nick: How long does it take to create and record an eurodance song?

Michal: When I was a beginner it lasted very long time but now I can make the one song in a few days but of course I need the inspiration.

Nick: Michal, tell me a little bit about the gear and the sofware you use. How important it is?

Michal: I use FL studio, it is the great programme which is used by many famous producers. I love to use VST z3ta +.

Nick: Could you please offer some tips for the people who want to create eurodance music?

Michal: You need mainly good melody and female vocals, but it is the long way to make normal eurodance, I would say it is just dance music in the start.

Nick: Which are your favorite 90s eurodance music acts?

Michal: The first in line E-Rotic, Blue System, Masterboy and many others.

Nick: Please tell me which are your current and future music projects.

Michal: So far I know about three: Pulse Of The Beat, Floor Action and then my little project Donatien.

Nick: Thank you, Michal and good luck!


Friday, June 14, 2013

Interview with songwriter and producer Roby Arduini



Roby Arduini is a famous Italian Eurodance songwriter and music producer. Some of the famous Eurodance acts he produced are Antares, Capella, Anticapella, and Agostini to name just a few.

Nick: Hello, Roby, and thank you very much for accepting this interview for the visitors of my blog. Could you please introduce yourself in a few words?

Roby: I am a writer,musician(keyboards)and producer.Whe I was young I've been very influenced by Genesis an Pink Floyd and I start to write  music 360°.

Nick: Please tell me how you've started your journey as an eurodance producer and some of the notable acts you've produced.

Roby: In the 80s I played in a band togheter with my friend Mauro Farina and then we started to write and produce music.See my bio..

Nick: Which was the gear used in the 90s for making eurodance music? Please name some important instruments if possible.

Roby: Analogue machine lke Jupiter8 Prophet5 and akay sampler.

Nick: How was the process of making an eurodance tune? Which was the base idea it all started from? Was it build around a chorus or an instrumental riff?

Roby: Basicly I prefer to start from an instrumental riff..

Nick: It seems in today's music compression is used quite a lot. How much was it used back in the 90s?

Roby: Not so much on the master. but a lot on every single track.

Nick: By analyzing several eurodance riffs it seems they usually follow a typical structure. Could you please explain how was a riff developed?

Roby: Catchy and groovy.

Nick: Many people ask about the famous 90s eurodance kick. Could you please explain how this was created?

Roby: It's a mix of varius kicks,such as from Linn,Tr909 and eq and compression.

Nick: Could you please offer some tips for the people who still want to create eurodance music? What makes a successful eurodance song?

Roby: Great melody and good arrangement.It's MUSIC.

Nick: The 90s eurodance is still loved today by many people. Do you think this genre can return on the commercial scene one day?

Roby: I don'k know,perhaps the bpm is too high.But the sound of pop dance is not so far.

Nick: Which are your current and future music projects?

Roby: I'm workin on my labels (Distar and Stereocity) to produce every kind of good music, from pop dance an soulful house.

Thank you, Roby, for taking your time to answer all my questions, I wish you lots of good luck!

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Interview with singer, composer and producer Roberto Zanetti


Roberto Zanetti is a famous Italian singer, music producer and composer. As a singer he is known under the stage name Savage, and as a music producer he uses the alias Robyx.

Nick: Hello, Roberto, and thank you very much for accepting this interview! Could you please introduce yourself in a few words?
Roberto: Myself....I'm a man who was lucky to dedicate a big part of his life to the music...
Nick: You are one of the pioneers of the eurodance genre. You've produced great hits for artists like Ice Mc, Corona, Double You and Alexia to name just a few. Could you please tell me how you've started your journey as an eurodance producer?
Roberto: My first experiences as producer started before, in late 1983 when I produced my first songs in Italodisco style
Nick: Which was the gear used in the 90s for making eurodance music? 
Roberto: We used Akai samplers, Akai Linn drum, Roland drum, Korg M1, Roland Jupiter, Yamaha DX7
Nick: How was the process of making an eurodance tune? Which was the base idea it all started from?
Roberto: I used to write a song first, sometimes a chorus only, with a piano
Nick: Is it true that most eurodance tracks were build in minor keys?
Roberto: All melodic disco of the 80's or the 90's was done in minor keys, very different from all music of the 70's which was in major insteed
Nick: It seems in eurodance music the riffs follow a kind of typical structure. Could you please explain how was a riff usually developed?
Roberto: I didn't had a typical riff....I used to make experiments and change riff song by song....
Nick: Many people ask about the famous 90s eurodance kick. Could you please explain how this was created?
Roberto: It was created using different sounds together, one of them was the famous kick of the Roland TR 909
Nick: It seems in today's music compression is used quite a lot. How much was it used back in the 90s?
Roberto: Compressors were used in big studios only because they were very expansive....I used them on vocals only.
Nick: Could you please offer some tips for the people who still want to create eurodance music? 
Roberto: An eurodance song could be a hit when it has a good chorus, a strong and new instrumental riff, a melodic verse, and the singer a very nice voice.
Nick: The 90s eurodance is still loved today by many people. Do you think this genre can return on the commercial scene one day?
Roberto: I think dance music of today is largely based over the music of the 90's, I think it's a genre that will never die...
Nick: Which are your current and future music projects?
Roberto: As a label (DWA) a new version of Baby Baby by Corona and a new project
Nick: Thank you very much, Roberto, for taking your time to answer all my questions, I wish you lots of good luck!

You can hear the famous 90's hit song "Take away the colour" - ICE MC, produced by Roberto Zanetti below:


Sunday, April 21, 2013

Interview with composer and producer Denis Curman


Denis Curman is a famous Croatian Italo/Eurodance/Eurobeat music composer and producer. He is the producer behind the 90s eurodance acts “Nina” , “Roxy” & “Hergegboys" and the latest acts "Impressione", "Enrico" and "Orange Ltd." who were huge succeses in Japan and Europe few years ago.

Nick: Hello, Denis, and thank you so much for accepting this interview. Please introduce yourself in a few words.

Denis: Hello Nick, it is always nice to talk about the 90' and eurodance ! As you know, I am composer in the first place and then the producer, this probably affect my work cause' I do have different approach and the way of doing the things related.

Nick: Could you please tell me how you've started your career as an eurodance producer?

Denis: Becoming the producer actually never was my idea, but due to a lack of available producers in Croatia, I was simply forced to learn and work on my own tracks by my self, except for the tracks I did with my italian producers like Laurent Gelmetti (Time Records), Bratt Sinclaire, Dave Rodergs and Alberto Contini (A.Beat.C Records).
In the same period I worked with the Domenico Livrano & Rene Baumann all gathered around David Brandes, so as I've worked on my tracks it was required to finish them and not just shipp them as a demo.
Definitely huge experience, money can't buy. Fred Ventura and Marcel Van der Belt have always been a great friends and supporters, and their great experience, knowledge and support helped me a lot.

Nick: Which was the base idea behind an eurodance tune? How it all started? Was it build around a chorus or an instrumental riff?

Denis: Concerning the basic idea, it doesn't matter if we talk about the Eurodance or Rock songs !
There are only good and bad songs, it's always been and will remain the same fact. It is all about the music and the basic idea, if the song is really good it should work well in all possible arragements and production styles. My personal style is always the same, sit down by the piano and start playing and work on something, first of all you should know what are you after of course, if you work on Eurobeat/Hi-Nrg song you should create melodies in that particular style and tempo > very smooth, but yet agressive type of melody, half the tempo of the track.
If you do work on Eurodance track, it require once again very catchy Chorus with great Riff and Clubby atmo,it is not so complex as Hi-Nrg songs, but on the other hand require more attention on the production side.
The foundation of every Hit Record is Melody > and this shall remain the same for next million years !

Nick: Which was the main equipment used in the 90s for making eurodance music? Please name some important instruments if possible.

Denis: Equipment used really vary form styles of the production we've been working on ! On HiNrg Tracks Emu modules, Roland JD-800/990,Roland Juno,Linn Drum !
On Eurodance tracks so many samples on AKAI S1100 (Zero G CD ), Roland JV 1020 & JV 2080, Nord Lead,Korg M1,Novation SuperNova.

Nick: Could you please tell me how much was compression used back in the 90s? It seems to be very used in today's music.

Denis: Compression ! Well it should be used as dynamic controller in the first place > the point is to control dynamic of the recording and use it and not to abuse it as the creative tool in the mixing process.
Loudness war for sure it will kill the creative side of the business, too much compression means to much of squashing the sound (dynamic range), it is very easy to make something rather small out of something big,but it is impossible to make something big out of the something small.
You can't hear any more the beauty of the available dynamic range as you could have in the 80' or 90', just listen up to those recording and you should really notice the difference. Today everyone work in the 24Bit resolution, giving you 144dB in your recording ( 6dB per 1 Bit ),yet it is impossible to hear the full dynamic range due to ultra heavy compression and over processing. Just listen up Dire Straits or Queen recording made in the days, you should get the clear picture what we are missing these days.
Hard Disk recording on the other hand enables everyone to work with the huge amount of dynamic tools not available previously, but it should be used carefully and for the tasks that is made for.
Side Chain is a great way of controlling the mix, particularly pointing out on the foundation of the mix "Low End", so be creative and force Mono signal for Kick,Bass and Snare, once you got these channels sitting right in your mix, you are almost done. Input Gain Staging is the most important thing you should think about beside mono and stereo source, Work digital but think analogue, watch out on your meters on each channel, input signal shouldn't be above -18dB in any scenario, you need enough headroom hitting your outboard and entire mix, bear on mind that each dynamic module shall add additional dB on your incoming signal, so watch your Gain Reduction meter and act accordingly, use dynamic tools to shape and control dynamics, not to pump up your signal level, never use anything on your master fader > it has to sound right in the mix with no insert on your master bus.

Nick: Many people ask about the famous 90s eurodance kick. Could you please explain how this was created?

Denis: Kick ! I've used only one specific sample, as we've used only one sample for Open Hi Hat, as you should know by now there are thousands of samples and libraries available, but as always only few of them are used and abused.

Nick: Please offer some tips for the people who still want to make eurodance music, which are the main things they should focus on?

Denis: Advice for Eurodance / Italo dance ! As my Co-Producer Laurent Gelmetti always say to me, use your brain and your ears, listen, work and be creative. It is not so easy as it might appear, for a start you should work for some particular Vocalist, you should be familiar with their capabilities, listen to thier previous works, the way they sing, taking the air, vocal range, the colour of their voice, what you can achieve with them and how to manipulate with their voice to get the exact form of the song you are after and aiming for.
Listen to your favorite artists, play along with them, pay ultra close attention on melody and the way they deliver that melody to you, once you got familiar with the problem start working on your next hit record. Imagine your favorite artists, relax and start playing your melody to fit your favorite Artists vocal style. Be aware of the fact, if the song sounds like a crap, probably it is and there is no Vocalist who can make it better, they can make it sound better but crap remain the crap, you need great melody line and don't be fooled by the sound or performance, if the song is great it shall be great by the piano or a guitar, on the other hand if the song by itself is bad, there is no producer, sound engineer or Vocalist who can fix it and make you a one hit wonder.

Nick: The 90s eurodance is still loved today despite the years. Do you think this genre can return on the commercial scene one day?

Denis: Well, the Eurodance is alive more then ever if you ask me, maybe not in the form we've been used to, but if you really pay attention these days, you will hear Eurodance influence everywhere, Max Martin in USA is pure Eurodance using more acoustic instruments, but it is 100 % Eurodance,
Vocal Trance and Progressive House is based on Eurodance, you can hear the same type of melodies,riffs and arragements you could heard in the 90'.
What we are missing these days comparing with Eurodance is enthusiasm and creativity, my god we were really creative those days, supporting each other, fighting for each copy sold. Today due to the Internet and Illegal File sharing, informations are shared within second around the globe, and despite that fact it happened that entire industry is destroyed instead of getting better and better. Those were the days with no cell phones and no internet, fans waiting for new releases and supporting their artists. This is very expensive business in the first place, very hard to recoup the costs, requires real hard work, and without proper sell and support from the fans you got destroyed industry. Eurodance is about love and happiness, today everyone talk about struggling how to survive, it seems that people don't care that much for music or any sort of cultural events.
Bear on mind that what makes Eurodance so special were creative people and their efforts, it is not enough to buy and download the latest softwares, you need to push the boundaries and your creative side and work hard to get those results.
It was a very particular point of time I am afraid it will not happen again.
However the point is, listen to the music not the sound ! ! !

Nick: Which are your current and future music projects?

Denis: Concerning my latest releases, there are Impressione, Enrico, Orange Ltd.,nR Element with the Akyr Music, Dina Rao is a brand new born ready star from San Francisco under the umbrella of Walz Music and her executive producer Aaron Walz, working on her album and this summer smash EuroHouse Single Every Little Piece Of Me coming out soon.
Hard work pays off Nick, hope this will help a bit in the future.

Nick: Thank you very much, Denis, for taking your time to give this interview, I wish you all the best!

You can hear the latest Denis Curman releases at http://www.myspace.com/mclagomusic


Interviews with Eurodance producers

From now on from time to time I will have posted interviews with famous Eurodance producers. So make sure you come back to read all and learn from the pros ;)

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

How to Create the Eurodance Riff

While inspiration is always great, after analyzing many songs in the genre I've figured out some methods that will help you build your riff.

First, decide if you are going to use 1/8 or 1/16 notes. Or you can work with both.

The second step is to decide the form of your riff. Below are the main forms your riff can take (of course there can be more). We will concentrate on the first 3 notes. You can use the notes of the given chord to build the riffs, but is not 100% mandatory to stick to them, you can also use nearby notes.

The V method  (1/16 notes)


The V method - upside down (1/16 notes)


For both these methods continue with the form until you make one measure, but you can variate the ending. Remember that the distance between the 2 consecutive notes can be as long as one octave.

The broken chord method (1/16 notes)



For this method copy the form 2 more times until you make one measure (variate the next 2 forms).

The chord method (1/8 notes)


For this method copy the form more until you make one measure but change the intervals or use chord inversions.

The linear method (1/8 notes)


For this method add 3 or 4 more notes (1/8) until you make one measure, but change the pattern (don't keep it linear).

The pattern method

Start building a pattern (let's say for the first 4 bars) and then you're copying the pattern over the next 12 bars respecting the harmony rules (chord progressions). Or you could create a double pattern (first 8 bars).

The no rules method

Build a catchy riff on your piano keyboard. Don't stick to any rules!

Friday, February 8, 2013

How to recreate the classic Eurodance sound

This tutorial is brought to you with the help of Krasi from the dancetheria.com forum - Thank you, Krasi!

Alright, let's learn how to recreate the famous classic Eurodance sound.

First we need a virtual synth, we will use Synth1 because it's free and it's very good.

http://www.vst4you.com/pages/vst%20instruments/synth1.html 

Follow the next steps:

1.set both oscillators to saw

2. adjust the fine tuning of the second oscillator to +12

3. on the amplifier envelope use the following settings:

- set attack to a bit over 0
- set decay and sustain to their maximum values
- set release a little above 0 or more

Tip: keep experimenting with the enevelope to get different sounds!

4. use a low pass filter, add some resonance

5. add chorus to make your lead more phat


Here is a photo that shows one example that sounds great:


Keep experimenting for new sounds! Good luck!




Sunday, February 3, 2013

The Eurodance Samples Pack


DISCLAIMER: I'm in now way affiliated with the links below, all content belongs to their original owners

Drums - TR 909
http://machines.hyperreal.org/manufacturers/Roland/TR-909/

http://simenschi.com/909/

TX81Z Lately Bass
http://patcharena.com/free-yamaha-tx81z-lately-bass-pack/


Korg M1 Piano
http://www.failedmuso.com/blog/?p=431


Leads/Pads/Strings

Roland Juno 106:
http://www.pacificmicro.org/Legowelt%20Juno%20106%20Samples%20101.zip

Synth1 VST
http://www.vst4you.com/pages/vst%20instruments/synth1.html
Many presets: http://veryrandomstreams.blogspot.com/2012/03/over-10000-free-patchessounds-for-free.html 


Effects (FX)

Roland U 220
http://martin78.com/free-samples/roland-u-220-drum-fx-samples/


Of course there are more samples available on the Internet but these ones should be enough to help you start ;)

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Making Beautiful Riffs - The Pattern Method

* under development

This method means you're building a pattern (let's say for the first 4 bars) and then you're copying the pattern over the next 12 bars by respecting the harmony rules (chord progressions). Or you could create a double pattern (first 8 bars).

This method was used quite a lot in the 90s Eurodance songs.

Making Beautiful Riffs - The Broken Chords Method

This method is pretty simple to use, as the name says, you're using broken chords instead normal chords to create the riff. 

Tip: use also chord inversions to create more interesting riffs



Making Beautiful Riffs - The V Metod

Happy New Year! 

When it comes to making beautiful Eurodance riffs, please note that some of them follow some typical patterns.

Method 1 - I will call this "The V method"

Let's study more closely. You can take the notes of the chords and by alternating 2 notes you start playing "up-down-up-down", or you can take the root note of the chord and play it alternatively up one octave (up-down-up-down). You can use the V (up-down) or the upside down V (down-up) to make this pattern.


Tip: insert 2 extra notes instead one! example: